Billions of years of R&D
Billions of years of R&D
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naturepersonworld:

 

cumulus mediocris, Matt
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zerostatereflex:

The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang 
A beautifully animated description of what we know about the creation of the Universe, so far. We can see most of the how, though who knows how long this can last. Does the universe build in enough time for the beings that study it, to reveal why it happened? We’ll see I guess. :D
zerostatereflex:

The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang 
A beautifully animated description of what we know about the creation of the Universe, so far. We can see most of the how, though who knows how long this can last. Does the universe build in enough time for the beings that study it, to reveal why it happened? We’ll see I guess. :D
zerostatereflex:

The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang 
A beautifully animated description of what we know about the creation of the Universe, so far. We can see most of the how, though who knows how long this can last. Does the universe build in enough time for the beings that study it, to reveal why it happened? We’ll see I guess. :D
zerostatereflex:

The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang 
A beautifully animated description of what we know about the creation of the Universe, so far. We can see most of the how, though who knows how long this can last. Does the universe build in enough time for the beings that study it, to reveal why it happened? We’ll see I guess. :D
zerostatereflex:

The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang 
A beautifully animated description of what we know about the creation of the Universe, so far. We can see most of the how, though who knows how long this can last. Does the universe build in enough time for the beings that study it, to reveal why it happened? We’ll see I guess. :D
zerostatereflex:

The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang 
A beautifully animated description of what we know about the creation of the Universe, so far. We can see most of the how, though who knows how long this can last. Does the universe build in enough time for the beings that study it, to reveal why it happened? We’ll see I guess. :D
zerostatereflex:

The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang 
A beautifully animated description of what we know about the creation of the Universe, so far. We can see most of the how, though who knows how long this can last. Does the universe build in enough time for the beings that study it, to reveal why it happened? We’ll see I guess. :D
zerostatereflex:

The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang 
A beautifully animated description of what we know about the creation of the Universe, so far. We can see most of the how, though who knows how long this can last. Does the universe build in enough time for the beings that study it, to reveal why it happened? We’ll see I guess. :D
zerostatereflex:

The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang 
A beautifully animated description of what we know about the creation of the Universe, so far. We can see most of the how, though who knows how long this can last. Does the universe build in enough time for the beings that study it, to reveal why it happened? We’ll see I guess. :D
zerostatereflex:

The Beginning of Everything — The Big Bang 
A beautifully animated description of what we know about the creation of the Universe, so far. We can see most of the how, though who knows how long this can last. Does the universe build in enough time for the beings that study it, to reveal why it happened? We’ll see I guess. :D
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Snow melts and flash freezes into an icy downhill river. A bunch of snowbanks in Russia began to melt, then it got cold again quickly, flash-freezing into the icy river you see here.
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anitaprentice:

Afghan children go to class in a refugee camp on the outskirts of Jalalabad. Photo by Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images       
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sci-universe:

These spiky little bunches of ice, called frost flowers, form on thin and new ice in the Arctic Ocean. (Photos by Mattias Wietz)
sci-universe:

These spiky little bunches of ice, called frost flowers, form on thin and new ice in the Arctic Ocean. (Photos by Mattias Wietz)
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odditiesoflife:

Rare Ice Disks
Although extremely rare, ice disks, also known as ice circles, do indeed appear naturally from time to time when conditions are perfect. Above are a few examples of people who have been lucky enough to stumble onto one while holding a camera.
Ice discs form on the outer bends in a river where the accelerating water creates a force called ‘rotational shear’, which breaks off a chunk of ice and twists it around. As the disc rotates, it grinds against surrounding ice — smoothing into a circle. A relatively uncommon phenomenon, one of the earliest recordings is of a slowly revolving disc was spotted on the Mianus River and reported in a 1895 edition of Scientific American.
source 1, 2
odditiesoflife:

Rare Ice Disks
Although extremely rare, ice disks, also known as ice circles, do indeed appear naturally from time to time when conditions are perfect. Above are a few examples of people who have been lucky enough to stumble onto one while holding a camera.
Ice discs form on the outer bends in a river where the accelerating water creates a force called ‘rotational shear’, which breaks off a chunk of ice and twists it around. As the disc rotates, it grinds against surrounding ice — smoothing into a circle. A relatively uncommon phenomenon, one of the earliest recordings is of a slowly revolving disc was spotted on the Mianus River and reported in a 1895 edition of Scientific American.
source 1, 2
odditiesoflife:

Rare Ice Disks
Although extremely rare, ice disks, also known as ice circles, do indeed appear naturally from time to time when conditions are perfect. Above are a few examples of people who have been lucky enough to stumble onto one while holding a camera.
Ice discs form on the outer bends in a river where the accelerating water creates a force called ‘rotational shear’, which breaks off a chunk of ice and twists it around. As the disc rotates, it grinds against surrounding ice — smoothing into a circle. A relatively uncommon phenomenon, one of the earliest recordings is of a slowly revolving disc was spotted on the Mianus River and reported in a 1895 edition of Scientific American.
source 1, 2
odditiesoflife:

Rare Ice Disks
Although extremely rare, ice disks, also known as ice circles, do indeed appear naturally from time to time when conditions are perfect. Above are a few examples of people who have been lucky enough to stumble onto one while holding a camera.
Ice discs form on the outer bends in a river where the accelerating water creates a force called ‘rotational shear’, which breaks off a chunk of ice and twists it around. As the disc rotates, it grinds against surrounding ice — smoothing into a circle. A relatively uncommon phenomenon, one of the earliest recordings is of a slowly revolving disc was spotted on the Mianus River and reported in a 1895 edition of Scientific American.
source 1, 2
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awkwardsituationist:

a murmuration of starlings at marseilles, signaling the beginning of winter. in search of the warmer winters of britain and northern france, thousands make the journey from the harsher climates of continental europe and scandinavia.  
seeking safety in number, starlings, prey to peregrines, merlins and sparrowhawks, gather in large flocks, trying to avoid the edge where they can be picked off. each bird strives to fly as close to its neighbours as possible, instantly copying any changes in speed or direction. as a result, tiny deviations by one bird are magnified and distorted by those surrounding it, creating rippling, swirling patterns. 
the question that science has yet to answer is what physiological mechanisms allow this to happen almost simultaneously in two birds separated by hundreds of feet and hundreds of other birds. It’s as if every individual is connected to the same network, no matter the size of the flock, forming, in essence, one single entity. 
starlings may simply be the most visible and beautiful example of a biological criticality that also seems to operate in proteins and neurons, hinting at universal principles yet to be understood.
awkwardsituationist:

a murmuration of starlings at marseilles, signaling the beginning of winter. in search of the warmer winters of britain and northern france, thousands make the journey from the harsher climates of continental europe and scandinavia.  
seeking safety in number, starlings, prey to peregrines, merlins and sparrowhawks, gather in large flocks, trying to avoid the edge where they can be picked off. each bird strives to fly as close to its neighbours as possible, instantly copying any changes in speed or direction. as a result, tiny deviations by one bird are magnified and distorted by those surrounding it, creating rippling, swirling patterns. 
the question that science has yet to answer is what physiological mechanisms allow this to happen almost simultaneously in two birds separated by hundreds of feet and hundreds of other birds. It’s as if every individual is connected to the same network, no matter the size of the flock, forming, in essence, one single entity. 
starlings may simply be the most visible and beautiful example of a biological criticality that also seems to operate in proteins and neurons, hinting at universal principles yet to be understood.
awkwardsituationist:

a murmuration of starlings at marseilles, signaling the beginning of winter. in search of the warmer winters of britain and northern france, thousands make the journey from the harsher climates of continental europe and scandinavia.  
seeking safety in number, starlings, prey to peregrines, merlins and sparrowhawks, gather in large flocks, trying to avoid the edge where they can be picked off. each bird strives to fly as close to its neighbours as possible, instantly copying any changes in speed or direction. as a result, tiny deviations by one bird are magnified and distorted by those surrounding it, creating rippling, swirling patterns. 
the question that science has yet to answer is what physiological mechanisms allow this to happen almost simultaneously in two birds separated by hundreds of feet and hundreds of other birds. It’s as if every individual is connected to the same network, no matter the size of the flock, forming, in essence, one single entity. 
starlings may simply be the most visible and beautiful example of a biological criticality that also seems to operate in proteins and neurons, hinting at universal principles yet to be understood.
awkwardsituationist:

a murmuration of starlings at marseilles, signaling the beginning of winter. in search of the warmer winters of britain and northern france, thousands make the journey from the harsher climates of continental europe and scandinavia.  
seeking safety in number, starlings, prey to peregrines, merlins and sparrowhawks, gather in large flocks, trying to avoid the edge where they can be picked off. each bird strives to fly as close to its neighbours as possible, instantly copying any changes in speed or direction. as a result, tiny deviations by one bird are magnified and distorted by those surrounding it, creating rippling, swirling patterns. 
the question that science has yet to answer is what physiological mechanisms allow this to happen almost simultaneously in two birds separated by hundreds of feet and hundreds of other birds. It’s as if every individual is connected to the same network, no matter the size of the flock, forming, in essence, one single entity. 
starlings may simply be the most visible and beautiful example of a biological criticality that also seems to operate in proteins and neurons, hinting at universal principles yet to be understood.
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currentsinbiology:

Mushrooms make their own wind
Biologists have long thought that the spores produced by a mushroom’s cap simply drop into the wind and blow away. The problem with that notion, said Emilie Dressaire, a professor of experimental fluid mechanics at Trinity College in Hartford, Conn., is that spores can be dispersed even when the air is still. So how do the mushrooms do it? Dressaire, along with Marcus Roper of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), believe they have found the answer: they make their own wind.
Dressaire will present the findings in a talk today at the 66th Annual Meeting of the American Physical Society’s (APS) Division of Fluid Dynamics (DFD), held Nov. 24-26, 2013, in Pittsburgh, Pa.
Using high-speed videography and mathematical modeling of spore dispersal in commercially grown oyster and Shiitake mushrooms, Dressaire, Roper, and their students found that the fungi created their wind by releasing water vapor. The vapor cools the air locally, and this creates convective cells that move the air around in the mushroom’s vicinity.
Caption: The spores released by an Amanita form a cloud of bright little specks. Credit: Patrick Hickey
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malformalady:

Spider weaves a web in the hole of a leaf